Among the Great Masters of Oratory: Scenes in the Lives of Famous Orators

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D. Estes, 1901 - 296 páginas
 

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Página 151 - In vain, after these things, may we indulge the fond hope of peace and reconciliation. There is no longer any room, for hope. If we wish to be free ; if we mean to preserve inviolate those inestimable privileges for which we have been so long contending' ; if we mean not basely to abandon, the noble struggle in which we have been so long engaged, and which we have pledged ourselves never, to abandon, until the glorious object of our contest shall be obtained', we must fight,! I repeat it,, sir, WE...
Página 62 - Into thy hands I commend my spirit : for thou hast redeemed me, O Lord, thou God of truth.
Página 20 - I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke, But here I am to speak what I do know. You all did love him once, not without cause : What cause withholds you then to mourn for him? O judgment! thou art fled to brutish beasts, And men have lost their reason! Bear with me; My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar, And I must pause till it come back to me.
Página 146 - And what have we to oppose to them ? Shall we try argument? Sir, we have been trying that for the last ten years. Have we anything new to offer upon the subject? Nothing. We have held the subject up in every light of which it is capable ; but it has been all in vain. •Shall we resort to entreaty and humble supplication?
Página 28 - If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this mantle : I remember The first time ever Caesar put it on ; 'Twas on a summer's evening, in his tent ; That day he overcame the Nervii. — Look, in this place ran Cassius...
Página 145 - Is this the part of wise men, engaged in a great and arduous struggle for liberty ? Are we disposed to be of the number of those who having eyes see not, and having ears hear not, the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation ? For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst and to provide for it.
Página 30 - I tell you that which you yourselves do know; Show you sweet Caesar's wounds, poor poor dumb mouths, And bid them speak for me: but were I Brutus, And Brutus Antony, there were an Antony Would ruffle up your spirits and put a tongue In every wound of Caesar that should move The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.
Página 85 - Create in me a clean heart, and renew a right spirit within me...
Página 29 - Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up To such a sudden flood of mutiny. They, that have done this deed, are honourable; What private griefs they have, alas, I know not, That made them do it; they are wise and honourable, And will, no doubt, with reasons answer you.
Página 20 - And dip their napkins in his sacred blood ; Yea, beg a hair of him for memory, And, dying, mention it within their wills, Bequeathing it, as a rich legacy, Unto their issue.

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