Tait's Edinburgh Magazine

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William Tait, Christian Isobel Johnstone
W. Tait, 1841
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Página 117 - I have trodden the winepress alone ; and of the people there was none with me: for I will tread them in mine anger, and trample them in my fury; and their blood shall be sprinkled upon my garments, and I will stain all my raiment.
Página 280 - Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth. Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness : for they shall be filled. Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy. Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God. Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God. Blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness' sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Página 380 - Is this your man according to God's own heart? The sneer, I must say, seems to me but a shallow one. What are faults, what are the outward details of a life; if the inner secret of it, the remorse, temptations, true, often-baffled, never-ended struggle of it, be forgotten ? ' It is not in man that walketh to direct his steps.
Página 305 - Science should ever create any material revolution, direct or indirect, in our condition, and in the impressions which we habitually receive, the Poet will sleep then no more than at present, but he will be ready to follow the steps of the Man of Science, not only in those general indirect effects, but he will be at his side, carrying sensation into the midst of the objects of the Science itself.
Página 306 - ... influences as excite and sustain these powers ; he is not one, but both. Every man's mind is, in this respect, modified by all the objects of Nature and art ; by every word and every suggestion which he ever admitted to act upon his consciousness ; it is the mirror upon which all forms are reflected and in which they compose one form. Poets, not otherwise than philosophers, painters, sculptors and musicians, are, in one sense, the creators, and, in another, the creations, of their age.
Página 216 - Now I'ma wretch, indeed— methinks I see him already in the cart, sweeter and more lovely than the nosegay in his hand ! —I hear the crowd extolling his resolution and intrepidity !— What volleys of sighs are sent from the windows of Holborn, that so comely a youth should be brought to disgrace!— I see him at the tree! The whole circle are in tears! — even butchers weep!— Jack Ketch himself hesitates to perform his duty, and would be glad to lose his fee, by a reprieve.
Página 380 - Really his utterances, are they not a kind of 'revelation' — what we must call such for want of some other name? It is from the heart of the world that he comes; he is portion of the primal reality of things. God has made many revelations: but this man too, has not God made him, the latest and newest of all? The 'inspiration of the Almighty giveth him understanding': we must listen before all to him.
Página 380 - He is by no means the truest of Prophets ; but I do esteem him a true one. Farther, as there is no danger of our becoming, any of us, Mahometans, I mean to say all the good of him I justly can. It is the way to get at his secret...
Página 378 - Knox had been without blame. He is the one Scotchman to whom, of all others, his country and the world owe a debt.
Página 394 - As we have therefore opportunity, let us do good unto all men, especially unto them who are of the household of faith.

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