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Oh! cruel fate! | 7 wilt thou | never re | place me | 7 In a mansion of peace, | 1 where no perils can chase me? ||

Never a gain shall my brothers em | brace me, || 7 They died to defend me, | 7 or | live to de | plore. |||

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Where is my cabin door, | fast by the wild | wood? ||

Sisters and sire, | 7 did ye | weep for its | fall? |||
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Where is the mother that | looked on my child-
hood? |||

7 And where is the bosom | friend, | dearer than |

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all? | | |

Ah! | 7 my | sad | soul, | long abandoned by | pleasure,

Why did it doat on a fast-fading | treasure? ||| Tears, like the | rain-drops, | 7 may | fall without 1 | measure,

1 But rapture and beauty | 1 they cannot re | call. |||

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Yet 7 all its fond | 7 recollections suppressing || One | dying | wish | 7 my lone | bosom shall |

draw. |||

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Erin! 7 an exile | 7 be | queaths thee his | blessing || Land of my forefathers! || Erin go | bragh! ||

Buried and cold, | 7 when my | heart | stills her | motion, ||

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Green be thy fields | sweetest | isle of the | ocean | 1 And thy harp-striking | bards | sing a | loud with devotion

Erin | 1 ma vournin! | Erin | go | bragh. |||

EXERCISE VI.

LUCY. WORDSWORTH.

Three years 7 she | grew, | 7 in | sun and show

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er, ||

Then | nature | said, | 7a | lovelier | flower[

1 On earth 7 was

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never | sown: ||

self | 7 will | take;||

This child I to my

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| She shall be

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mine,

||

1 A lady | 7 of my

and I will | make |
own.
own. |||

7 My self will to my

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1 Both | law and
7 The girl
7 In earth and

|

Shall | feel | 7 an | over | seeing | power | 7 To kindle | 1 and re | strain. |||

darling || be, |

impulse: || 7 and with me [

7

in | rock | 7 and | plain, |

heaven, | 7 in | glade and bower, {

7 She shall be sportive | 7 as the | fawn |

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1 That | wild with glee | 7 a | cross the | lawn |

springs; ||

7 Or up the mountain

7 And hers 7 shall be the

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breathing | balm, |

7 And | hers | 7 the | silence | 7 and the | calm |

1 Of mute in sensate | things. |||

|

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1 The floating | clouds | 7 their | state shall | lend 7 To | her; ||7 for | her | 7 the | willow | bend; || 1 Nor shall she fail to | see, |

Even in the motions | 7 of the storm |

Grace | 7 that shall | mould | 7 the | maiden's | form, 1 By silent sympathy. |||

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| 7 The stars of | midnight | 7 shall be | dear | and she shall | lean her ear |

1 To her;

7 In many a secret | place, |

1 Where | rivulets | dance their wayward | round;||

7 And beauty, || born of | murmuring | sound, | 1 Shall pass into her | face. |||

7 And | vital | feelings of de | light |

1 Shall rear her | form | 7 to | stately | height; || 1 Her | virgin | bosom | swell; ||

Such thoughts 7 to | Lucy | 7 I will | give, | 1 While she and | I7 to gether | live | Here 7 in this | happy | dell. '|||

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Thus | Nature | spake. ||1 The work | 7 was | done. ||

HI

me |

1 How soon 1 my | Lucy's | race | 1 was | run.
7 She | died, || 7 and | left to
1 This | heath, |7 this | calm and
| 7 The | memory of what has | been, ||
| 7 And never more | will be. |||

quiet | scene; ||

EXERCISE VII.

PAPER.-A CONVERSATIONAL PLEASANTRY.

DR. FRANKLIN.

Some wit of old, || such | wits of old there | were, |

1 Whose hints | 7 showed | meaning, | 7 whose allusions | care, ||

7 By one brave | stroke | 7 to | mark all human | kind,

Called clear | blank | paper every | infant | mind; || Where still, 7 as | opening | sense | 7 her | dictates I

wrote, |

Fair Virtue blot. |||

7 The thought was happy, | pertinent, and true! ||

1 Me | thinks a genius | 1 might the | plan pur |

put a | seal; | 1 or | Vice, | 1 a

sue.

I, 7 (can you | pardon my pre | sumption?) || I No wit, 7 no genius, yet for once, 7 will try. |||

Various the paper, | various | wants pro | duce; || 7 The wants of | fashion | elegance | 7 and use. || Men 7 are as various; | 7 and if | right I | scan, Each sort of paper || represents | some | man. ||¦ Pray | note the fop; || half | powder | 7 and | half | lace! | Nice as a place. He's the gilt paper, | 7 which a part you | store, 7 And | lock from | vulgar | hands | 7 in the scru | toire.

bandbox | 7 were | his dwelling [ ||

7 Me | chanics, | servants, | farmers, | 7 and | so forth | 7 Are copy paper, | 7 of in | ferior | worth; | Less | prized, || more | useful; | 7 for your desk de | creed; ||

Free to all pens, | 7 and prompt at every I need. |||

7 The | wretch | 7 whom | avarice || bids to | pinch. and spare, ||

| Starve, cheat | 7 and | pilfer, | 7 to enrich an | heir,

7 Is coarse brown | paper; || such as | pedlars | choose

1 To wrap up wares | 7 which | better | men | 7 will use. | | | |

Take | next 7 the miser's contrast; | | 1 who | de stroys

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Health, ❘ fame and fortune | 7 in a | round of | joys.||

7 Will | any | paper | match | him? || Yes, | 7 through | out;||

He's a true sinking| paper, || past | all'| doubt.||| 7 The retail | poli | tician's | anxious | thought | this side | always | right, | 7 and that | stark naught: |

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Deems

|

7 A dupe to

knaves; ||

7 He foams with | censure; | 7 with applause he

raves; | | |

rumors, || 7 and a tool to |

He'll want no|type| 7 his weakness | to pro |

claim, |

7 While such a thing as fools-cap 7 has a name. | | |

1 The | hasty | gentleman, | 7 whose | blood runs | high; |

1 Who picks a quarrel | 7 if you | step a wry; | 7 Who can't a jest, | 7 a | hint, | 7 or | look en | dure! |

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