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philosophy; | 17 and though seemingly | destitute of wisdom, 1 he was really | wise. ||| No | reading | or | study | 1 had contributed | 7 to disenchant | 7 the fairy | land | 7 a | round him. 1 ||| Every thing | furnished him | 7 with an oppor tunity 7 of mirth, || 7 and though some from his insensi | bility, | 1 a |

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thought him, 7
fool, he was
phers 1 should
philosophy | 1 is
happiness, 7 when
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such an idiot | 7 as philoso-
wish to imitate: || 7 for all
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only | forcing the trade of |
| Nature | seems to deny the

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pleasing

They, 7 who like our | slaves, |1 can | place themselves | 7 on that | side of the world 7 in | which every thing 7 appears in a light, 7 will find | something | 7 in every oc 1 currence | 1 to ex | cite their | good | humor. ||| 1 The most calamitous e | vents, | | either to them selves 1 or others, 7 can | bring | no new | 7 affliction; 7 the whole | world | 7 is to them, I 7 a theatre, | 1 on which | comedies only | 7 are I 1 | acted. ||| All the bustle of heroism, | 7 or the 1 | rants of ambition || serve | only to | heighten | 7 the absurdity | 7 of the scene | 7 and make I the humor 7 more poignant. ||| 7 They | feel, in short, | 7 as | little | anguish | 1 at their own distress, 7 or the complaints of | others, 7 as the | under | taker, | 7 though | dressed in | black, feels | sorrow | 7 at a | funeral. | ||

1 Of | all the | men | 7 I ever | read of, | 7 the famous Cardinal de Retz | 7 possessed this | happiness of temper | 7 in the highest degree.

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| | | As he was a man of | gallantry, |1 and des | pised 7 all that I wore the pedantic appearance | 7 of philosophy, | 1 wher | ever | pleasure | 1 was to be sold | he was generally | foremost | 7 to I raise the auction. ||| Being a | universal | 1 I admirer of the | fair | sex, || 7 when he | found | one | lady | cruel, | 7 he generally | fell in love | 1 with an other, | 7 from | whom he expected | 1 a more favorable | 7 re | ception. | | | 7 If | she, | too, | 7 rejected his ad | dresses, ||7 he never | thought of retiring into | deserts, | 7 or | pining in hopeless distress; || he persuaded himself, | 7 that in | stead of | loving the | lady, | 7 he had | only | fancied | 7 that he had loved her; | | 7 and | so | I all was well again. |||

1 When | fortune | wore her | angriest | look, || 1 and he at last | fell into the power | 7 of his most | deadly enemy, || Cardinal | Maza | rine, || (being con | fined a close | prisoner, | 7 in the | castle of | Valenciennes), | 1 he | never attempted | 7 to support his distress | 7 by | wisdom | 7 or phi | I losophy; 7 for he pre | tended to | neither. ||| 1 He only laughed | 7 at him | self | 7 and his | persecutor; || 7 and | seemed | infinitely | pleased | 1 at his new situation. | | | 7 In this mansion of distress, though secluded from his | friends, | | 7 though denied | all the amusements, | 7 and | even the conveniences of | life, | 7 he | still re | tained his good | humor; || laughed at | all the | little spite of his | enemies: || 7 and | carried the | jest so far as to be re | venged, | 7 by | writing the life 7 of his | gaoler. | ||

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All that the wisdom of the proud | 7 can teach, 1 is to be stubborn, | 7 or| sullen, | 7 under mis fortunes. || 7 The | Cardinal's ex | ample | 7 will instruct us to be | merry, | 7 in | circumstances | 7 of the highest af | fliction. | || 7 It | matters not | 1 whether our good | humor | 7 be construed, | 1 I by others, 7 into | insensibility; | 7 or | even | idiotism: 7 it is happiness | 7 to our | selves; || 1 and none but a fool, | 7 would | measure his | satisfaction | by | what the world | thinks of it.|||

7 The happiest | silly | fellow | 1 I ever | knew, 7 was of the number of those | good natured | creatures | 7 that are | said to do | no | harm | 7 to | any but themselves. |||7 When ever he fell | into any misery, || 7 he usually called it || Seeing | life.' || 7 If his | head | 7 was broke by a | chairman, 7 or his | pocket | picked by a | sharper, 7 he comforted himself | 7 by | imitating | 7 the Hibernian | dialect | 7 of the | one, or the more | fashionable | cant | 7 of the other. ||| Nothing | came a miss to him. |||

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7 His inattention to

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money matters | 7 had

in censed his father | 7 to | such a degree, | 7 that all intercession of | friends, | 7 in his | favor, 7 was fruitless. |||

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7 The old gentleman | 7 was on his death bed. 7 The whole family, | 7 and | Dick | 7 al mong the | number, || gathered around him. |||

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7 'I | leave my | second | son | Andrew,' | 7 said the expiring miser, | 7 my whole es | tate; | | 7 and de | sire him | 7 to be | frugal.'|||

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Andrew, | 7 in a sorrowful | tone | 7 (as is usual 7 on those occasions), | | prayed | Heaven to pro | long his | life and health | 7 to enjoy | himself! |||

7 I recommend | Simon, | 7 my third | son, 7 to the care of his elder | brother; | | 7 and leave him, | 7 be | side, | four | thousand | pounds.'|||

Ah! father,' | 7 cried | Simon | 7 (in great af | fliction, 7 to be sure), | 7 may | Heaven give | | you life and health | 7 to en | joy it your self! ' || |

poor | Dick, || 'as for |

7 At last turning to you, you have always | 7 been a | sad | dog; || you'll never come to | good: || you'll never be rich; || 7 I leave | you | 7 a | shilling, | 7 to | buy a | halter.' || |

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Ah! | father,' | 7 cries | Dick, | 7 without any e | motion, | 7 may | Heaven | give you | life and | health | 7 to enjoy it your self!' 111

EXERCISE V.

THE EXILE OF ERIN.

T. CAMPBELL.

7 There came to the | beach | 7 a poor | exile of |

Erin,

1 The dew on his | thin robe | 1 was heavy and |

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chill; | |

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7 For his country he sighed, | 7 when at twilight repairing,

1 To wander a lone | 7 by the | wind-beaten |

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hill.

7 But the day-star | 7 at | tracted his | eye's sad de | | votion; ||

7 For it | rose 7 on his | own native | isle of the | ocean, |

7 Where once | 7 in the | fervor of | youth's | warm emotion |

7 He sung the bold | anthem | 7 of | Erin go | bragh. |||

Sad is my fate! | 7 (said the | heart | broken | stran

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ger) |

1 The wild-deer and wolf | 7 to a covert can }

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flee,

1 But I have no | refuge | 7 from | famine and |

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danger,

7 A | home, and a | country | 7 remain not to | me. |||

Never again | 7 in the | green | sunny | bowers |

1 Where my forefathers | liv'd | 7 shall I | spend the sweet hours |

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1 Or | cover my | harp | 7 with the | wild woven | flowers

7 And strike to the numbers | 7 of | Erin go | bragh. |||

Erin! 7 my country! | 1 though | sad and for | saken,

7 In dreams | 7 I re | visit thy | sea-beaten | shore: | 7 But a las! 7 in a far foreign | land I a | waken, | And sigh for the | friends | 7 that can meet me no more. |||

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