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heavenly vision: || 7 but | showed | first | 7 unto | them of Damascus, || 7 and at Jerusalem, | 7 and throughout | all the coasts of Judea, | 7 and then 7 to the | Gentiles, || that they should re pent | 7 and | turn to | God, |1 and | do | works | meet for repentance. ||| 7 For | these | causes | 1 the Jews caught me in the temple, | | 7 and | went about 7 to kill me. | || Having | therefore 1 7 obtained | help of | God, | 7 I continue | 7 unto this day, witnessing | both to | small and | great, saying none | other | things | 7 than those I 7 which the prophets | 7 and | Moses | 1 did | say, | 7 should come, ||| 7 that | Christ | 7 should | suffer, | 7 and that | he should be the first | 7 that should rise from the dead, | 7 and should show | light | 7 unto the people, and to the | Gentiles. ||| 7 And as he thus | spake for himself, || Festus | said with a loud voice, || Paul, | thou art beside thyself; || much | learning | 7 doth | make thee | mad. ||| But he said, |7 I am | not | mad, | 7 most | noble | Festus, 7 but speak forth the | words of | truth | 7 and soberness. ||| 7 For the king | knoweth of these things, | 7 be | fore | whom | also | 7

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I speak freely; || 7 for | I am per | suaded | 7 that none of these | things | 7 are | hidden from | him; || 7 for this thing | 7 was not ❘ done in a cor1 ner. King A | grippa, | 7 believest thou the prophets? || | 7 I know | 1 that thou believest. ||| Then | 1 Agrippa | said unto | Paul, | Al | most | thou persuadest | me | 1 to be a | Christian. ||| And Paul said, | 7 I would to God, 1 that | not |

but also all that | hear me this

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only thou,
day, 7 were
| such as I am, 17 ex | cept | these bonds. |||

both | al | most, | 7 and | altogether

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EXERCISE III.

ON SINCERITY.

FROM ARCHBISHOP TILLOTSON (ABRIDGED).

TRUTH | 7 and sin | cerity | 1 have | all the ad | vantages of appearance, | 7 and many more. 1 ||| 7 If the show of any thing | 1 be | good for | 1 I any thing, | | 7 I am sure | 7 the reality | 7 is | better: || for | why | 1 does | any man | 7 dis | semble, 7 or seem to be that which he | is | not, || but because 7 he thinks it | good to | have | 1 the qualities 7 he pre | tends to? | | | Now the | best way 7 for a man to | seem to be | any thing, | is to be in reality, || what he would seem to be: || 1 besides, 7 it is often as | troublesome | 7 to support the pretence of a good quality, | 7 as to have it; | 7 and | if a | man | have it not, | 7 it is | most likely he will be dis | covered to | want it; ||7 and then, all his labor to | seem to have it, I 7 is lost. ||1 There is something | un | natural 7 in painting, | 7 which a | skilful | eye | 7 will | easily discern | 7 from | native | beauty |1 and complexion. |||

Therefore, 1 if any man think it convenient to seem good, I let him | be so in | deed: || 7 and

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| then | 1 his goodness will appear | 7 to | every one's 7 satisfaction. ||| 7 Par | ticularly, | | as to the affairs of ❘ this | world, | 7 in | tegrity | 7 hath | many ad | vantages | over all the arti | ficial | modes of dissimulation | 7 and deceit. || | | 1 It is much the | plainer | 7 and | easier, || much the | safer, | 7 and ❘ more secure way of | dealing in the world; || 7 it has less of trouble and | difficulty, 7 of entanglement | 7 and per | plexity, 7 of danger and | hazard | 7 in it. | || 7 The I | arts of deceit and cunning | 7 con | tinually | grow weaker, 7 and less serviceable 7 to those that practise them; || 7 where | as | 7 in | tegrity gains | strength by | use; || 7 and the more and longer any man | practiseth it, | 7 the greater service | 7 it does him: || 7 by con | firming his repu | tation, | 7 and encouraging | those 7 with whom he | hath to do, | 7 to re | pose the greatest | confidence | 1 in him: || which is an unspeakable ad | vantage | 1 in | business, | 7 and the affairs of | life. | | |

1 But insincerity | 7 is very | troublesome to ❘ manage. || 7 A hypocrite | 7 hath | so many | things to attend to, | 7 as | make his | life | 7 a | very perplexed and | intricate | thing. ||| 7 A | liar | 7 hath | need of a good | memory, || lest he contradict | 7 at one time | 7 what he | said at another: | | 1 but | truth | 7 is always con | I sistent, 7 and needs | nothing to | help it | out: | 1 it is always | near at | hand, | 7 and | sits upon our lips; || 7 where | as a lie | 17 is | troublesome,

| 7 and needs a great | many more | 7 to make it | good.

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7 In a word, whatsoever convenience | 7 may be thought | 7 to be in | falsehood | 7 and dis | simulation, | 7 it is soon | over: | | but the inconvenience of it | 7 is perpetual; || 7 be it brings a man | under an ever | lasting | jealousy and suspicion; || so that he is not lieved 7 when he speaks the truth; ||7 nor | trusted | 7 when perhaps, | 7 he | means | honestWhen a man hath | once | forfeited | 7 the reputation | 7 of his integrity, || nothing |7 will then serve his | turn, | | neither | truth | nor | 1 falsehood. |||

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once; | 1 or

7 In | deed, | 7 if a man were | only to | deal in the world 7 for a day, | 7 and should never have occasion | 7 to con | verse | more with man | kind, it were | then 7 no | great | matter | 7 (as far as respects the affairs of this world) | 1 if he spent his repu | tation | all at | ventured it | 7 at | one | throw. | || But if he | be to continue 7 in the world, 7 and would have 1 the advantage of reputation | whilst he is in it, || let him | make | use of | truth | 7 and sin | cerity | 7 in | all his words and actions; || 1 for | nothing but this | 7 will hold | out | 7 to the end. | ||| All other arts | 1 may | fail; | 1 but | truth | 7 and integrity | 1 will carry a | man | through, | 1

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and bear him out | 7 to the | last. |||

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EXERCISE IV.

ON HAPPINESS OF TEMPER.

GOLDSMITH.

WRITERS of | every | age | 1 have en | deavored to show | 7 that pleasure | 7 is in | us, | 7 and not in the objects || offered | 1 for our a | musement. 7 If the soul be happily dis | posed, every thing | 7 becomes | capable | 7 of affording | 7 entertainment; | | 7 and dis | tress 7 will almost | want a name. I | Every occurrence passes in re | view | 7 like the figures 7 of a pro | cession; || some | 7 may be others | ill dressed; 17 but none but a fool | 7 is for this, | 7 en | raged with the master of the ceremonies. | |! I

awkward,

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7 I remember | 7 to have | once | seen a | slave, | 7 in a fortification | 7 in | Flanders, | 7 who appeared no way touched | 7 with his situ | ation. 1 He was | maimed, | 7 de | formed | 7 1 and | chained: || 7 o | bliged to | toil | 7 from the appearance of day 7 till | night-fall, || 7 and condemned to | this | 7 for | life; | | yet with | all these circumstances | 7 of apparent | wretchedness, 7 he sung, would have danced, | 7 but that he wanted a leg, | 7 and appeared the merriest, happiest | man | 1 of | all the | garri

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son.

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1 What a practical | 7 philosopher | 7 was here, || a happy constitution | 7 supplied

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