Address Delivered Before the Associated Instructors of Boston and Its Vicinity, on Their Anniversary, Oct. 10, 1816

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John Eliot, 1813 - 28 páginas
Address discusses use of more standardized methods of student instruction and instructor qualifications.
 

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Página 5 - And it shall come to pass, when ye be come into the 'land which the Lord will give ye, according as he hath promised, that ye shall keep this service. And when your children shall say unto you, what mean ye by this service ? that ye shall say, It is the sacrifice of the Lord's passover, who passed over the houses of the children of Israel in Egypt, when he smote the Egyptians, and delivered our houses.
Página 7 - ... spring. The prejudice which the public sustains from a wrong education of children, is an evil of the same nature, as it in a manner starves posterity, and defrauds our country of those persons, who, with due care, might make an eminent figure in their respective posts of life.
Página 14 - ... of our ancestors, and foundations of hope for our posterity. But the improvement on ancient systems, and indeed in an essential respect, on modern ones, which has been made in our seminaries, is de.
Página 21 - most unfortunately some pedagogues who appear never to be more gratified than in recounting the frequent instances and the severity with which they inflict corporal punishment To hear them one is reduced to the dreadful dilemma of discrediting either their humanity or their veracity." " It is neither very natural, nor very easy for a child to respect and love those from whom he is in the habit of receiving the discipline of the ferule or the rod. Even the influence of natural affection, and the obligations...
Página 20 - There are," remarks Mr. Payson, "most unfortunately some pedagogues who appear never to be more gratified than in recounting the frequent instances and the severity with which they inflict corporal punishment To hear them one is reduced to the dreadful dilemma of discrediting either their humanity or their veracity." " It is neither very natural, nor very easy for a child to respect and love those from whom he is in the habit of receiving the discipline of the ferule or the rod. Even the influence...
Página 1 - ... in its application to the arts and in its popular aspects, in Boston. In 1811 he imported apparatus to illustrate a course of lectures on Astronomy and Natural Philosophy, which was paid for out of the sale of tickets to the course. We have also before us a copy of an "Address delivered before the Associated Instructors of Boston and its Vicinity on their Anniversary, Oct. 10, 1816. By Thomas Payson, Esq., AM One of the Public Instructors of Boston. Printed by John Eliot, 1816.
Página 8 - ... philosophy. The place which he selected for this purpose was a public grove, called the Academy, from Academus, a venerable Athenian, who had given it, that it might be used for gymnastic exercises.
Página 4 - ... compromise of our paternal and local prejudices of education, by soliciting and cultivating a liberal and friendly correspondence with other similar societies and respectable individuals, engaged in the same arduous and useful employment with ourselves, to promote the interests of education generally, especially of the Youth under our care, and what is particularly desirable, a more uniform system and mode of instruction in our schools and academies...
Página 13 - Children like tender Oziers take the Bow And as they first are fashion'd always grow For what we learn in Youth, to that alone, In age we are by second Nature prone.

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