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Pehtuhquisseet, the man who Utumhecannoowuh, their
is tall
11 hatchet

13 Pehtuhquissoo, he is tall 11 Uwoh ; he, that man, this man, Pehtubquissoouk, they are tall 11

this thing

6, 16 Penumpausoo, a boy

10 Pepoun, winter (Chip.)

8

W.
Peyuhtommauwukon, religion 16
Pim moussie, go (Chip.) 8 Wasecheh, her husband
Pomthalo, he goes (Shaw.) 6 (Shaw.)

7 Poutouwah ; dress the kettle, Waughecheh, her husband 7 make a fire

7 Waunseet, the man who is Poutwah, dress the kettle, beautiful

12 &c. (Chip.)

7 Weecuah, house (Shaw.) 6 Pumisseh ; go, walk thou 8,17 Weekuwuhm, house

6 Pumissoo, he goes

6,11 Weenseh, his head (Shaw.) 6 Pumissoouk, they walk 11 Weensis, his head

6
Weeseh : See weenseh
S.
Weeween, marry

8 Weewin, marry (Chip.)

8 Scutta, fire (Chip.) 7 Weghaukun, hair

7 Sekeenundowhukon, hatred 16 Welah, he, that man, (Shaw.) 6 Sepoo, river

7 Welathoh, hair (Shaw.) 7 Sippim, river (Chip.)

8 Wepeetalee, his teeth (Shaw.) 7 Skeesacoo, eye (Shaw.)

Wepeeton, his teeth

ng Sottago, eight (Moh.) 9 Wialeh, ten (Moh.)

9. Squathauthau, a girl, (Shau.) 6 Wigwaum, house (Chip.) 7 Stauw, fire 7 Wisk, five (Moh.)

9
Wiskinkhie, his eyes (Chip.) 7
T.
Wnechun, his child

10

Wneeweh, I thank you Tah, where (Chip.)

7 8

Wnissoo, he is heautiful Tawné, how (Chip.)

12

Wnoghquetookoke, StockTeggeneh, two (Moh.) 9

bridge

15 Tehah, where

8 Teuhtoh, nine (Moh.)

Wnoghquetookoke ndinne

9 Thepee, river (Shaw.)

toghpeh, I ride to Stock-
ny
bridge

15 Tmohhecan, hatchet or axe

nocheTowacah, ear (Shaw.)

7 Towohque, ear

6

toghpeh, I ride from

Stockbridge. Tuneh, how

7

Wnukuwoh ndiotuwoh, yes-
Tupouwus, seven

9
terday I fight

15

ndiotuwohpoh,
U.
yesterday I fought

15 Uhwhundowukon (noun) love 16 Wupkauch ndiotuwoh, toUkeesquan, his eyes

morrow I fight

15 Unisk, his hand

17 Uskot, one (Moh.)

9

Y. Utoh, his heart

7 Utumhecan, his hatchet 12 Yoiyok, six (Moh.)

9

11,

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12

15

II. INDEX OF THE PRINCIPAL MATTERS IN EDWARDS' OB-

SERVATIONS AND THE EDITOR'S NOTES.

o The references to Dr. Edwards' work are made to the original paging,

which is preserved in the margin of the present edition. The other refe-
rences (distinguished by the letter N) are to the numbers of the Editor's
Notes.

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A.

D.
Page.

Page.
Abstract terms; as common in the Daggett (Rev. H.) his remarks on
Mohegan as in other languages 16 the modes of expressing the re-

and N. 12 lations of father, mother, &c.
formed in the De- in various dialects

N. 8
laware by the termination wa- Declensions, none in Delaware N. 4
gan

ib. Delaware language, radically the
in the South Ame- same with the Mohegan

5
rican languages

N. J2

the most widely extend-
Adjectives, none in Mohegan 11 ed of any language, east of the

few in the Delaw. N. 7 Mississippi. See Introduction to

mode of expressing de- Notes.
grees of
comparison

ib.

Indians, where situated;
their place supplied by &c.

N. 15
verbs

ib. Dual number, in some American
Affixes, used to express the pro- languages

N. 5
12
manner of using them 14
analogy of Hebrew and

F.
Mohegan

16
Algonkins speak a dialect of Mo- Father, Mother, &c. not used with-
hegan

5 out the pronominal affixes, my,
Appellatives (father, mother, &c.)

thy, &c.

13
never used in Mohegan without

and N. 8
a pronominal affix

13 Future tense, expressed by affixing

the sign of it to the adverb, &c.

which accompanies the verb. 15
C.

and N. 11

nouns

Cases, only one in Mohegan which

G.
varies from the nominative 16

in the Massachusetts lang. N. 4. Genders, no diversity of in Mo-
none in the Mexican lang. ib. hegan

10
seven in the Quichuan ib.

in the Massachusetts and
Cherokee, specimen of verbs in, N. 14 Delaware

N. 3
Chili, the language has a singular

in Delaware, in the case
dual and plural number N. 5 of certain animals, expressed by
Chippe way language, radically the a distinct word

ib.
same with the Mohegan

5 Guaranese language has only a
specimen of 7
singular number

N. 5
Comparison of adjectives

12

ib.

H.

Mohawk, has no labials
numerals

ib. Hebrew, its analogy in some re

and NI spects to the Mohegan 12, 16 Mohegan, dialects of it spoken Hurons and Iroquois cannot pro

throughout New England 5 nounce the labials

N. 2

various dialects enume. rated

has eight parts of speech 15 I.

radically

the same with

the language of Eliot's Bible 5 Iroquois : See Hurons.

Lord's Prayer in it 9 Infinitive mode, never used in Mo

its resemblance to He. hegan

13
brew in the affixes

12, 16 Inflexions of nouns, none in the

Indians, various names Mexican or Orinokese languages of

N. 15
N. 4 Muhhekanneew : See Mohegan.
K.

Munsees : See Minsi.

Killistenoes: See Knisteneaux.

N. Knisteneaux speak a dialect radi. cally the same with the Mohegan 5

Nanticokes, or See also Notes. Nanticooks

5 where situated, &c. N. 15

where situated, &c. N. 15

Natick language, properly called L. the Massachusetts

ib. Nipegons

5 Labials, abound in Mohegan

9

- the same with the Winnone in Mohawk ib. nebagoes

N. 15 remark of La Hontan re

where situated, &c. ib. specting

N. 2 Nouns may be turned into verbs La Hontan, his acquaintance with

in the Indian languages 14 the Indian languages denied by

and N. 10 Charlevoix

N. 15 Numbers (of nouns, &c.) their raLenni Lenape, the true name of riety in the American languages the Delawares

N. 5 Lord's Prayer : See Pater Noster. Numerals, in Mohegan & Mohawk 9

how far they may be

used to ascertain affinities of di-' M. alects

N.1

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ib.

0.

5

Mahicanni, the true name of the
Mohegans

N. 15
Massachusetts language, radically
the same with the Mohegan 5

Indians, their situation, &c.

N. 15 Menomonees

5 where situated, &c. N. 15 Messisaugas or Messisaugers

where situated, &c. N. 15 Mexican language has no inflex

ions of nouns, except for the singular and plural Minsi or Munsee, radically the same with the Mohegan

5 numerals

N. 1 Mohawk, entirely different from Mohegan

9 specimen of

ib.

Orinokese languages have no inflexions of nouns

N. 4 do not apply the plural number to irrational animals N. 5 Orthography of the Indian lan

guages, example of the differences occasioned by its unsettled state

N. 1 Ottowaus, more properly W'tawas 5 where situated, &c. N. 15

5 where situated, &c. N. 15

N. 4 Ottogamies

are

P.

Specific terms, more used than generic ones

N. 14 Parsons (Gen.) his list of Shawa. St. Francis Indians, dialect of Monese words 6 hegan

5 Participles, all Mohegan verbs have

where situatthem

11
ed

N. 15 are declined, as verbs Stockbridge dialect, the one which

12 is the subject of Edwards' work 5 Pater Noster, in Mohegan

9 Suffixes : See Affixes. in Mohawk

ib. See also Note 1.

T. how far translations of it may be used, to prove affi

Tenses, past and future used 15 nities of dialects

N. 1 past and future expressed Penobscot language, radically the

by a form of the present

ib. same with the Mohegan

5

expressed sometimes by Peruvian language : See Quichuan.

variations of the noun or adverb Plural number, how formed in Mo- accompanying the verb

ib. hegan

10

and N. 11 of the American languages, various forms of N. 5

U.
Prefixes: See Affixes.
Prepositions, very few in Mohegan 15 Unami numerals

N. 1 rarely used except in composition

ib.

V. Pronouns, prefixed and suffixed to nouns, and verbs

13

Verb substantive, wanting in Mo

hegan and many other Indian Q languages

14

and N.9 Quichuan, or Peruvian, language transitive, never used withhas seven cases of nouns N.4 out expressing both agent and

object

13 R.

Verbs, the nominative and accusa

tive pronouns always affixed to them

14 Râle's MS. Dictionary of the Ab

their radis is the third per. naki N. 15

15 Relations (of father, mother, &c.)

son sing. indic.

formed out of nouns 14 more carefully distinguished by

and N. 10 the Mohegans than by Euro

how used in the American peans

11 remarks on the Indian

languages in speaking of differmode of using nouns expressing.

ent objects

N. 14

Vocabularies of Indian languages, these relations

N. 8

caution to be used in forming Relative pronouns who and which

12
them

17 wanting in Mohegan

and N. 14 also wanting in some languages of S. America, N. 6

W.

S.

Wagan, a Delaware termination

for abstractterms; correspondSaukies

5

ing to -ness in English, & -heit where situated, &c. N. 15 or -keit in German

N. 12 Shawanese, radically the same Winnebagoes

5 with the Mohegan 5 Woagan, the same as wagan

N. 12 specimen of 6 W'tawas (or Ottowaus)

5 OBITUARY NOTICE OF PROFESSOR PECK.

IT being an established custom of the Massachusetts Historical Society to notice the decease of its members, and to give some account of their life and character, it was thought that this could not be better done, in the present instance, than by copying the following article, published in the Boston Daily Advertiser of the 8th of October, 1822 ; which is understood to have been written by a distinguished citizen and scholar, whose undeviating friendship and kindness, for many years, brightened the existence of our departed associate. Some notes are here added by a member of the Society, to whom the deceased was known, and by whom he was respected and beloved from early life.

Dies at Cambridge on the 3d instant, WILLIAM DANDRIDGE PECK, Esq. aged 59, Massachusetts Professor of Natural History in Harvard University. * Mr. Peck enjoined on his surviving friends not to permit any ceremonious interment, or any of those publick testimonies of respect, by which the members of that seminary are accustomed, very properly, to express their regret at

* Mr. Peck was the son of Mr. John Peck, and was born in Boston, May 8th, 1763. His mother, whose original name was Jackson, died when this son was seven years old. Though this bereavement occurred to him at so early an age, he felt it keenly, and cherished her memory with fond affection, through the whole course of his life. It is not improbable that the event contributed, with other circumstances, to cast the shade of melancholy over the mind of the son, which at times required the best influence of his friends to disperse. At the commencement of the siege of Boston, in 1776, the family removed to Braintree, where the subject of this memoir for a time pursued his studies under the direction of the Rev. Mr. Weld; and removing afterwards to Lancaster, he was placed under the care and tuition of the Rev. Mr. Ward of Brookfield, by whom he was prepared for admission to the Col. lege, and by whom he was ever after esteerned and beloved. VOL. X.

22

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