The Omnium-gatherum: or, Bath, Bristol, and Cheltenham literary repository. By us two [R. Warner and R. Cruttwell].

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Página 191 - Careless their merits or their faults to scan, His pity gave ere charity began. Thus to relieve the wretched was his pride, And e'en his failings lean'd to virtue's side; But in his duty prompt, at every call, He watch'd and wept, he pray'd and felt, for all...
Página xiii - Fame is the spur that the clear spirit doth raise (That last infirmity of noble mind) To scorn delights and live laborious days; But the fair guerdon when we hope to find, And think to burst out into sudden blaze, Comes the blind Fury with the abhorred shears, And slits the thin-spun life. 'But not the praise...
Página 201 - ... property,) in the prosecution of the war, and in the treatment of the prisoners, so deep an impression of her depravity, that we never again can trust her in the management of our affairs and interests.
Página 144 - In return for your repeated advice to us, not to conclude any treaty with the House of Bourbon, permit me to give (through you) a little advice to the whigs in England. Let nothing induce them to join with the tories in supporting and continuing this wicked war against the whigs of America, whose assistance they may hereafter want to secure their own liberties ; or whose country they may be glad to retire to for the enjoyment of them.
Página 81 - She was a pretty little girl ; " and every body said, she was a very good little " girl. In short, one of her cousins, though " only a school-boy, took a particular fancy to " her. He soon after made his father and " mother his confidants ; and they were far '' from discouraging him. They probably thought " (as I do now,) that early attachments...
Página 192 - One grave in Boldre church-yard contains the mortal remains of this exemplary pair; over which stands a stone with the following epitaph, the former part of which was written by Mr. Gilpin, some time previously to his death. ' In a quiet mansion beneath this Stone secured from the afflictions and still more dangerous enjoyments of life...
Página 143 - But they are allowed to proclaim a cessation of arms, and revoke their proclamation as soon as in consequence of it our militia have been allowed to go home: they may suspend the operation of acts prohibiting trade, and take off that suspension when our merchants in consequence of it have been induced to send their ships to sea, in short, they may do...
Página 202 - This' wish of mine, ineffective as it may be, induces me to mention to you, that between nations long exasperated against each other in war, some act of generosity and kindness towards prisoners on one side has softened resentment and abated animosity on .the other, so as to bring on an accommodation.
Página 110 - William Baker was an old rustic, resident in a wild part of the parish of Boldre. In one of his walks Mr. Gilpin had lighted upon his cottage. On entering it he found its inhabitant, an aged, but stout and athletic man, eating his humble dinner. All within was neat and clean, and something indicative of strong sense and a cheerful mind, appeared in the countenance of the old peasant. In conversation...
Página 82 - ... thirty years, without having been almost as many days separated. No marriage could be more happy. All their schemes succeeded ; and they are now, in their old age, in affluent circumstances, and have six fine grandchildren to bear their name after them. They have often said to each other they never knew what could be called an affliction ; and only have to hope that God will be pleased to work with them by felicity, as He often does with others by calamity.

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