The French Metropolis: Paris; as Seen During the Spare Hours of a Medical Student

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C.S. Francis & Company, 1850 - 332 páginas
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Página 247 - The head was thrown back in such a position as to prevent his seeing his body. The pulse was much more sluggish than natural. Respiration and speech, but slightly affected, were gradually failing; but he could articulate distinctly until within a few minutes of his death. All the senses of the head remained quite perfect to the last. He died forty-eight hours after the fall. Repeated attempts were made to reduce the dislocation, but the transverse processes had become so interlocked that every effort...
Página 96 - Disguise thyself as thou wilt, still, Slavery, said I,— still thou art a bitter draught! and though thousands in all ages have been made to drink of thee, thou art no less bitter on that account.—'Tis thou, thrice sweet and gracious goddess...
Página 22 - France, there is a market, whither young girls resort, and stand hour after hour, with their flowing hair, rich and glossy, deriving additional lustre from the contrast with their naked shoulders. This is the resort of the merchant barbers, some of whom come even from England. The merchants pass along among them, examine the color, texture, evenness, and other qualities of the beautiful fleece, haggle for a sou, and finally buy.
Página 35 - Amour, at Belleville; la Chaumiere, Boulevard du Mont Parnasse; le Salon du Feu Eternal, Boulevard de 1'Hopital. \Yhen a guinguette adds an orchestra and a ball-room to its other attractions, it is called a bastringue. The houses which sell only wine and liquors are denominated guinches. The stranger...
Página 84 - ... Nay, Sir, I do value you more for being a Scotchman. You are a Scotchman without the faults of Scotchmen. You would not have been so valuable as you are had you not been a Scotchman." Talking of divorces, I asked if Othello's doctrine was not plausible:— " He that is robb'd, not wanting what is stolen, Let him not know 't, and he's not robb'd at all.
Página 208 - Here the o'erloaded slave flings down his burden From his gall'd shoulders; and, when the stern tyrant, With all his guards and tools of power about him, Is meditating new unheard-of hardships, Mocks his short arm, and quick as thought escapes, Where tyrants vex not, and the weary rest.
Página 22 - This is the resort of the merchant-barbers, some of whom come even from England. The merchants pass along among them, examine the color, texture, evenness, and other qualities of the beautiful fleece, haggle for a sous, and finally buy. The hair then, after being cut as closely as possible to the head, is weighed and paid for, and the girl goes home to prepare for another shearing, or perhaps to purchase a husband with her money. An American girl prefers to let her hair turn to silver on her own...
Página 218 - Nor number, nor example with him wrought To swerve from truth, or change his constant mind Though single.
Página 209 - The well-being of society demands, that means shall be adopted to separate its good elements from the bad...

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