The Granite Monthly: A New Hampshire Magazine Devoted to History, Biography, Literature, and State Progress, Volumen7

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Henry Harrison Metcalf, John Norris McClintock
H.H. Metcalf, 1883
 

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Página 286 - ... to enact, constitute, and frame such just and equal laws, ordinances, acts, constitutions, and offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the general good of the colony, unto which we promise all due submission and obedience.
Página 286 - God, and one of another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil body politic, for our better ordering and preservation and furtherance of the ends aforesaid...
Página 388 - Of peace on earth, good-will to men ! And in despair I bowed my head ; " There is no peace on earth," I said ; " For hate is strong, And mocks the song Of peace on earth, good-will to men...
Página 332 - In listless quietude of mind, I yield to all The change of cloud and wave and wind; And passive on the flood reclined, I wander with the waves, and with them rise and fall.
Página 92 - Seest thou a man diligent in his business? he shall stand before kings ; he shall not stand before mean men...
Página 48 - If the British march By land or sea from the town to-night, Hang a lantern aloft in the belfry arch Of the North Church tower as a signal light, — One, if by land, and two, if by sea ; And I on the opposite shore will be, Ready to ride and spread the alarm Through every Middlesex village and farm, For the country folk to be up and to arm.
Página 157 - That tinkle in the withered leaves below. Stillness, accompanied with sounds so soft, Charms more than silence. Meditation here May think down hours to moments. Here the heart May give a useful lesson to the head, And learning wiser grow without his books.
Página 139 - In this was every art, and every charm, To win the wisest, and the coldest warm: Fond love, the gentle vow, the gay desire, The kind deceit, the still-reviving fire, Persuasive speech, and more persuasive sighs, Silence that spoke, and eloquence of eyes.
Página 104 - Perhaps in this neglected spot is laid Some heart once pregnant with celestial fire; Hands, that the rod of empire might have swayed, Or waked to ecstacy the living lyre.
Página 104 - What sculpture is to a block of marble, education is to a human soul. The philosopher, the saint, or the hero ; the wise, the good, or the great man, very often lie hid and concealed in a plebeian, which a proper education might have dis-interred, and have brought to light.

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