The History of Greece, Volumen9

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T. Cadell, 1821
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Página 48 - Ye shall not add unto the word which I command you, neither shall ye diminish ought from it, that ye may keep the commandments of the LORD your God which I command you.
Página 47 - The freedom of our constitution will not permit that in criminal cases a power should be lodged in any Judge to construe the law otherwise than according to the letter.
Página 46 - ... to detect latent frauds and concealments, which the process of the courts of law is not adapted to reach ; to enforce the execution of such matters of trust and confidence as are binding in conscience, though not cognizable in a court of law ; to deliver from such dangers as are owing to misfortune or oversight ; and to give a more specific relief, and more adapted to the circumstances of the case, than can...
Página 151 - Grecian city, he summoned a congress of the states to decide upon her fate. By this assembly the same measure which the Thebans had meted out to the Phocians, at the conclusion of the Sacred War, was now measured out to her. It was decreed that the Theban state should be annihilated, the town utterly destroyed, the surviving inhabitants sold into slavery, and the territory given to the conquering allies. Alexander succeeded in saving the house of the poet Pindar from the flames, and all his descendants...
Página 47 - ... the law cannot be strained, by ' partiality, to inflict a penalty beyond what the letter will warrant; but in cases where the letter ' induces any apparent hardship, the crown has ' the power to pardon.' This excellence of legal system, not found among the republics of Greece, nor in Rome, nor in modern Europe beyond our own country, will hardly be looked for in Macedonia. There nevertheless the criminal...
Página 47 - ... courts of law is not adapted to reach ; to enforce the execution of such matters of trust and confidence as are binding in conscience, though not cognizable in a court of law ; to deliver from such dangers as are owing to misfortune or oversight ; and to give a more specific relief, and more adapted to the circumstances of the case, than can always be obtained by the generality of the rules of the positive or common law.
Página 55 - Slavery existed among them, as among the antient republics, but ap. parently a less numerous and more mitigated slavery. The people, of all ranks, above slavery, in cities and throughout the country, held the important right of judgment on life and death, and of bearing arms for common defence against forein or domestic disturbers of the common peace.
Página 44 - ... the history, not only that the royal authority in Macedonia was constitutionally limited, but how it was effectually limited ; judgement, in capital cases, being reserved to the people; and the maintainance of this important right being assured by the most powerful warranty, the general possession and practice of arms by the people. Hardly have we equal proof that equal security for individuals was provided by law in any republic of Greece. " It were very desirable to know what was the LEGISLATIVE...
Página 212 - ... his visit to Troy is highly interesting. ' Those * Those who have experienced the emotions, natural to all who have had the advantage of a classical education, on first approaching Athens, on first approaching Rome, on first even seeing the Mediterranean or the Adriatic, or any scene interesting to the imagination through acquaintance with the admirable authors of classical antiquity and the persons and events they have celebrated, will conceive what might be those of Alexander on this occasion;...
Página 299 - ... ancient authors, and with great simplicity by Arrian ; it is the more a curiosity as coming from a man of his eminence in his enlightened age. At a remote period, says he, a Phrygian yeoman, named Gordius, was holding his own plough on his own land, when an eagle perched on the yoke and remained whilst he continued his work. Wondering at a matter so apparently preternatural, he deemed it expedient to consult some person among those who had reputation for expounding indications of the divine will....

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