English in Nineteenth-Century England: An Introduction

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Cambridge University Press, 1999 M11 4 - 338 páginas
This book provides an introduction to nineteenth-century English in England. It examines a wide range of varieties, including political speeches, newspaper articles, advertisements, obituaries, Sunday School poetry, and culinary recipes, so as to illustrate the range of dialects and levels found in the language of that period. The first part of the book provides an overview of the subject, while the second part contains an extensive selection of texts. 100 exercises spread throughout the book serve to introduce the student to the problems and methods involved in English historical linguistics.
 

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Contenido

Regional and social varieties
26
22 Written and spoken English
27
23 Dialect and dialectology
28
24 Sociolect
36
25 Chronolects and the awareness of linguistic change
41
Spelling and pronunciation
44
32 Spelling reform
46
33 Punctuation
52
64 Wordformation
118
65 Meaning and change of meaning
125
66 Obsolescence and revival
134
67 Names
135
68 Idiolect
136
Text types and style
139
72 Style
151
Provisional conclusions
164

34 Pronunciation
53
35 Word stress sentence stress and intonation
62
Inflection
65
43 Pronouns
66
44 Verbs
67
Syntax
69
52 A survey of syntactical change
70
53 Individual problem areas
71
54 Text syntax
90
Lexis
92
62 Internal borrowing
102
63 Loanwords from foreign languages
106
Texts
165
I On language grammar and style T1T25
166
II On dialect T26T37
201
III On literature and criticism T38T51
215
IV On history and culture T52T98
230
Information on texts and authors
286
References
303
Index of names
320
Index of topics and titles
323
Index of selected words and pronunciations
334
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