The Freemason's Monthly Magazine, Volumen23

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Tuttle & Bennett., 1864
 

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Página 168 - My heart is smitten, and withered like grass; so that I forget to eat my bread.
Página 340 - The blessing of him that was ready to perish came upon me : and I caused the widow's heart to sing for joy. I put on righteousness, and it clothed me : my judgment was as a robe and a diadem.
Página 72 - From wandering on a foreign strand ? If such there breathe, go, mark him well; For him no minstrel raptures swell ; High though his titles, proud his name, Boundless his wealth as wish can claim, — Despite those titles, power, and pelf, The wretch, concentred all in self, Living, shall forfeit fair renown, And, doubly dying, shall go down To the vile dust from whence he sprung, Unwept, unhonored, and unsung.
Página 124 - And I will bring the blind by a way that they knew not, I will lead them in paths that they have not known : I will make darkness light before them, and crooked things straight. These things will I do unto them, and not forsake . them.
Página 2 - The little ones, unbuttoned, glowing hot, Playing our games, and on the very spot ; As happy as we once, to kneel and draw The chalky ring, and knuckle down at taw ; To pitch the ball into the grounded hat, Or drive it devious with a dexterous pat ; The pleasing spectacle at once excites Such recollection of our own delights, That, viewing it, we seem almost t' obtain Our innocent sweet simple years again.
Página 257 - It is a pleasure to stand upon the shore and to see ships tossed upon the sea; a pleasure to stand in the window of a castle and to see a battle and the adventures thereof below; but no pleasure is comparable to the standing upon the vantage ground of truth (a hill not to be commanded, and where the air is always clear and serene), and to see the errors and wanderings and mists and tempests in the vale below; so always that this prospect be with pity, and not with swelling or pride.
Página 279 - Not soon provoked, she easily forgives; And much she suffers, as she much believes. Soft peace she brings wherever she arrives; She builds our quiet as she forms our lives; Lays the rough paths of peevish nature even, And opens in each heart a little heaven.
Página 88 - The sun shall be no more thy light by day; neither for brightness shall the moon give light unto thee : but the Lord shall be unto thee an everlasting light, and thy God thy glory.
Página 68 - Goodness I call the habit, and goodness of nature the inclination. This of all virtues and dignities of the mind is the greatest, being the character of the Deity; and without it man is a busy, mischievous, wretched thing, no better than a kind of vermin. Goodness answers to the theological virtue charity, and admits no excess but error.
Página 279 - As through the artist's intervening glass, Our eye observes the distant planets pass ; A little we discover ; but allow, That more remains unseen, than Art can show : So whilst our mind its knowledge would improve...

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