Copying Early Christian Texts: A study of scribal practice

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Mohr Siebeck, Jul 19, 2016 - 578 páginas
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It is widely believed that the early Christians copied their texts themselves without a great deal of expertise, and that some copyists introduced changes to support their theological beliefs. In this volume, however, Alan Mugridge examines all of the extant Greek papyri bearing Christian literature up to the end of the 4th century, as well as several comparative groups of papyri, and concludes that, on the whole, Christian texts, like most literary texts in the Roman world, were copied by trained scribes. Professional Christian scribes probably became more common after the time of Constantine, but this study suggests that in the early centuries the copyists of Christian texts in Greek were normally trained scribes, Christian or not, who reproduced those texts as part of their trade and, while they made mistakes, copied them as accurately as any other texts they were called upon to copy.
 

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Contenido

The papyri and their handwriting
1
Writers and writing in the Roman Imperial period
11
The writers and writing of the papyri
20
Content material form and size
26
Material
30
Size
38
Conclusion
49
Codices
57
Lines per column
100
Marginal notes
108
Abbreviations
117
OUPCVOC
128
Stichometric counts
137
Copyists and faith
151
Excluded papyri
411
Tables
445

Sheets
65
Reading aids
71
Sense lines and stichometric layout
78
Conclusion
90
Writing the text
92

Términos y frases comunes

Información bibliográfica