Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, Volumen3

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T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1809
 

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Página 154 - Swinging slow with sullen roar; Or if the air will not permit, Some still removed place will fit, Where glowing embers through the room Teach light to counterfeit a gloom...
Página 162 - Clos'd o'er the head of your lov'd Lycidas? For neither were ye playing on the steep, Where your old Bards, the famous Druids, lie, Nor on the shaggy top of Mona high, Nor yet where Deva spreads her wizard stream: Ay me!
Página 326 - All the images of nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously but luckily: when he describes anything you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he was naturally learned; he needed not the spectacles of books to read Nature; he looked inwards, and found her there.
Página 153 - He thinks in a peculiar train, and he thinks always as a man of genius ; he looks round on nature and on life with the eye which Nature bestows only on a poet : the eye that distinguishes, in...
Página 139 - E'en in this early dawning of the year, Produce the plough, and yoke the sturdy steer, And goad him till he groans beneath his toil, Till the bright share is buried in the soil.
Página 327 - Admirable scenes and passages, without number, there are in his Plays ; passages beyond what are to be found in any other Dramatic Writer; but there is hardly any one of his Plays which can be called altogether a good one, or which can be read with uninterrupted pleasure from beginning to end. Besides...
Página 149 - But a true poet makes us imagine that we see it before our eyes : he catches the distinguishing features ; he gives it the colours of life and reality ; he places it in such a light that a painter could copy after him.
Página 266 - He seems to have been well acquainted with his own genius, and to know what it was that nature had bestowed upon him more bountifully than upon others; the power of displaying the vast, illuminating the splendid, enforcing the awful, darkening the gloomy, and aggravating the dreadful...
Página 153 - His descriptions of extended scenes and general effects, bring before us the whole magnificence of Nature, whether pleasing or dreadful. The gaiety of Spring, the splendour of Summer, the tranquillity of Autumn, and the horror of Winter, take in their turns possession of the mind.
Página 158 - Come with me from Lebanon, my spouse, with me from Lebanon : look from the top of Amana, from the top of Shenir and Hermon, from the lions' dens, from the mountains of the leopards.

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