The Diplomatic Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being the Letters of Benjamin Franklin, Silas Deane, John Adams, John Jay, Arthur Lee, William Lee, Ralph Izard, Francis Dana, William Carmichael, Henry Laurens, John Laurens, M. Dumas, and Others, Concerning the Foreign Relations of the United States During the Whole Revolution; Together with the Letters in Reply from the Secret Committee of Congress, and the Secretary of Foreign Affairs. Also, the Entire Correspondence of the French Ministers, Gerard and Luzerne, with Congress, Volumen2

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J.C. Rives, 1857
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Contenido

David Hartley to B Franklin London April 220 1779
52
To David Hartley Passy May 4th 1779
58
To Samuel Huntington President of Congress Braintree October
66
James Lovell to B Franklin Philadelphia June 13th 1779
71
To James Lovell Passy June 2d 1779
77
To James Lovell Passy October 17th 1779
86
James Lovell to B Franklin Philadelphia February 24th 1780
93
To James Lovell Passy March 16th 1780
98
To the President of Congress Passy June 1st 1780
108
W F Dumas Passy July 26th 1780
114
To James Lovell Passy August 10th 1780
121
Charles Vernon LieutenantGovernor of the Tower of London
127
James Lovell to B Franklin Philadelphia December 21st 1780
133
To Count de Vergennes Passy March 6th 1781
137
To Francis Lewis and the Board of Admiralty Passy March 17th
143
Agreement between Captain John Paul Jones and the officers of
149
To Thomas Lewis Passy May 16th 1781
156
To Major William Jackson Passy June 28th 1781
160
To Major William Jackson Passy July 5th 1781
166
John Adams to B Franklin Amsterdam October 4th 1781
172
Robert R Livingston to B Franklin Philadelphia November
180
To William Alexander Passy December 15th 1781
186
Remarks on the Conciliatory Bill
193
Robert R Livingston to B Franklin Philadelphia January 23d
195
To David Hartley Passy January 15th 1782 204
195
To the Count de Vergennes Passy January 18th 1782
206
Explanatory letter to Mr Hartley referred to in the preceding
212
To David Hartley Passy February 16th 1782
218
To the Count de Vergennes Passy March 3d 1782 222
222
Robert R Livingston to B Franklin Philadelphia March 9th
228
John Adams to B Franklin The Hague March 26th 1782
235
To David Hartley Passy April 5th 1782
240
To David Hartley Passy April 13th 1782
246
David Hartley to B Franklin London May 1st 1782
249
Robert R Livingston to B Franklin Philadelphia May 22d
256
Richard Oswald to B Franklin Paris June 5th 1782
263
To Robert R Livingston Passy June 25th 1782
267
JOURNAL
273
To Lord Shelburne Passy March 22d 1782
274
Notes for Conversation
282
To John Adams Passy April 21st 1782
288
To John Adams Passy May 8th 1782
296
To Lord Shelburne Passy May 16th 1782
303
Henry Laurens to B Franklin Ostend May 17th 1782
309
Lord Shelburne to B Franklin Whitehall May 28th 1782
319
Lord Shelburne to Richard Oswald Whitehall May 21st 1782
326
To Richard Oswald Passy June 11th 1782
334
de la Fayette to B Franklin Versailles Thursday morning
342
To David Hartley Passy July 10th 1782
348
Lord Shelburne to B Franklin Shelburne House April 20th
354
Rosencrone Minister of Foreign Affairs in Denmark to M
417
To David Hartley Passy March 23d 1783
424
The city of Hamburg to Congress March 29th 1783
427
To the Grand Master of Malta Passy April 6th 1783
433
To Count de Vergennes Passy May 4th 1782 295
439
To Henry Laurens Passy July 6th 1783
445
Explanation of the counter project of a treaty of amity and com
458
Plan of a treaty with Portugal
472
The Popes Nuncio to B Franklin
478
John Jay to B Franklin Passy September 11th 1783
482
To the President of Congress Passy September 27th 1783
488
To the President of Congress Passy December 25th 1783
494
To the President of Congress Passy December 26th 1783
500
David Hartley to B Franklin London March 2d 1784
501
Consular Convention
507
To Count de Mercy Argenteau Passy July 30th 1784
515
To the President of Congress Passy April 12th 1785
519
To Mr Grand banker at Paris Philadelphia July 11th 1786
525
Committee of Foreign Affairs to John Adams York in Pennsyl
537
To James Lovell Passy July 9th 1778
543
To James Warren Passy August 4th 1778
550
To the President of Congress Passy September 11th 1778 556
556
To the President of Congress Passy October 20 1778
563
The Commissioners to John Paul Jones Passy May 25th
570
To Samuel Adams Passy February 14th 1779
573
To Count de Vergennes Passy February 27th 1779
579
To the President of Congress Braintree August 3d 1779
585
To the President of Congress Braintree September 10th 1779599
599
To the President of Congress Braintree October 21st 1779
604
Instructions for a treaty of commerce with Great Britain
610
To the Governor of Corunna Corunna December 18th 1779
617
To the Count de Vergennes Paris February 12th 1780
624
Genet First Secretary for the Department of Foreign Affairs
630
Genet to John Adams Versailles February 20th 1780
636
To Samuel Adams Paris February 23d 1780
640
To Dr Cooper of Boston Paris February 28th 1780
646
To the President of Congress Paris March 3d 1780
648
To Edmund Jennings Paris March 12th 1780
657
To the President of Congress Passy March 14th 1780
660
To the President of Congress Paris March 19th 1780 667
667
To the President of Congress Paris March 24th 1780
673
To the President of Congress Paris March 26th 1780
678
To Count de Vergennes Paris March 30th 1780
684
To the President of Congress Paris April 3d 1780 694
694
To the President of Congress Paris April 6th 1780
700
To William Carmichael Secretary of the American Embassy
710
To the President of Congress Paris April 10th 1780
716
602
722
de Sartine Paris April 16th 1780
729

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Página 195 - Neither of the two parties shall conclude either truce or peace with Great Britain without the formal consent of the other first obtained; and they mutually engage not to lay down their arms until the independence of the United States shall have been formally or tacitly assured by the treaty or treaties that shall terminate the war.
Página 624 - SIR, I have received the letter, which you did me the honor to write to me on the...
Página 571 - Croix River to the highlands; along the said highlands which divide those rivers that empty themselves into the river St. Lawrence from those which fall into the Atlantic Ocean to the northwesternmost head of Connecticut River...
Página 368 - You are about to hold out a certain hope of peace to America without even informing yourself on the state of the negociation on our part. You are wise and discreet, sir; you perfectly understand what is due to propriety; you have all your life performed your duties. I pray you to consider how you propose to fulfill those which are due to the King?
Página 571 - Lawrence: comprehending all islands within twenty leagues of any part of the shores of the United States, and lying between lines to be drawn due east from the points where the aforesaid boundaries...
Página 239 - ... been obtained under the form, as proposed by the representation, which I delivered to the secretaries of state, and, I make no doubt, will sincerely join my Lord...
Página 37 - I remember right, a particular king is applauded for his politically exciting a rebellion among his subjects at a time when they had not strength to support it, that he might in subduing them take away their privileges which were troublesome to him : and a question is formally stated and discussed, "Whether a prince, who, to appease a revolt, makes promises of indemnity to the revolters, is obliged to fulfil those promises ?" Honest and good men would say ay : but this politician says, as you say,...
Página 375 - I send you also another paper, which I once read to you separately. It contains a proposition for improving the law of nations, by prohibiting the plundering of unarmed and usefully employed people. I rather wish than expect, that it will be adopted. But I think it may be offered with a better grace by a country, that is likely to suffer least and gain most by continuing the ancient practice ; which is our case, as the American ships, laden only with the gross productions of the earth, cannot be...
Página 457 - I have just received the letter you did me the honor of writing to me the 25th past. I did indeed receive your former letter of July, but being totally a stranger to the mentioned proceedings of Mr.
Página 299 - Virginia; setting him at entire liberty to act in his civil or military capacity, until the pleasure of Congress shall be known, to whom is reserved the confirmation or disapprobation of this discharge, in case they have made, or shall intend to make, a different disposition. "Given at Passy, this 9th day of June, 1782. "B. FRANKLIN, "Minister Plenipotentiary from the United States of America to the Court of France" I did not well comprehend the Major's conduct in refusing this paper.

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