Leviathan

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Cosimo, Inc., 2009 M01 1 - 416 páginas
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We take for granted today the concept of the "social contract"-that it's right for citizens give up some autonomy to the state in exchange for peace and order for all-but the idea was all but unconceived of until English philosopher THOMAS HOBBES (1588-1679) published his masterpiece, *Leviathan*. Written while the author was in self-imposed exile in France during the English Civil War and first published in 1651, this classic work of political thought laid the groundwork for the upheavals that would reshape human culture in later centuries, from the American and French revolutions to the ongoing refining of democracy that continues to this day. Required reading for students of world history, this is one of the great works of civic and social philosophy, presented in the original period language, and remains the best representation today of the author's intent and meaning.
 

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Review: Leviathan

Crítica de los usuarios  - Jacques Coulardeau - Goodreads

I will only consider some chapters in this approach. The a priori position is that God is the origin of everything, that the Bible is absolutely true about the history of humanity and its “creation ... Leer comentario completo

Review: Leviathan

Crítica de los usuarios  - Michal Paszkiewicz - Goodreads

Even though the book is full of confusion and heresy and I found myself disagreeing with most of his (other) thoughts, this was a very fascinating read. It gives a very good context for the turmoil ... Leer comentario completo

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Contenido

0fCounsell 142
162
Of Punishments and Rewards
173
Of those things that Weaken or tend to the Dissolution of a Commonwealth
179
Of the Office of the Soveraign Representative
187
Of the Kingdome of God by Nature
199
Of A Christian Commonwealth 32 Of the Principles of Christian Politiques
209
Of the Number Antiquity Scope Authority and Interpreters of the Books of Holy Scripture
212
Of the signification of Spirit Angell and Inspiration in the Books of Holy Scripture
220

Of the Vertues commonly called Intellectuall and their contrary Defects
37
Of the severall Subjects of Knowledge
46
Of Power Worth Dignity Honour and Worthinesse
48
Of the Difference of Manners
54
Of Religion
59
Of the Naturall Condition of Mankind as concerning their Felicity and Misery
68
Of the first and second Naturall Lawes and of Contract
72
Of other Lawes of Nature
80
Of Persons Authors and things personated
89
Of Commonwealth 17 Of the Causes Generation and Definition of a Commonwealth
93
Of the Rights of Soveraignes by Institution
96
Of severall Kinds of Commonwealth by Institution and of Succesion to the Soveraign Power
103
Of Dominion Paternall and Despoticall
111
Of the Liberty of Subjects
117
Of Systemes Subject Political and Private
124
Of the Publique Ministers of Soveraign Power
133
Of the Nutrition and Procreation of a Commonwealth
137
Of the signification in Scripture of the Kingdome of God of Holy Sacred and Sacrament
229
Of the Word of God and of Prophets
235
Of Miracles and their use
246
Of the signification in Scripture of Eternall life Hel Salvation the World to come and Redemption
251
Of the Signification in Scripture of the word Church
262
Of the Rights of the Kingdome of God in Abraham Moses the High Priests and the Kings of Judah
264
Of the Office of our Blessed Saviour
272
Of Power Ecclesiasticall
278
Of what is Necessary for mans Reception into the Kingdome of Heaven
332
the fourth part
337
Of The Kingdome of Darknesse 44 Of Spirituall Darknesse from Misinterpretation of Scripture
345
Of Djemonology and other Reliques of the Religion of the Gentiles
364
Of Darknesse from Vain Philosophy and Fabulous Traditions
379
Of the Benefit proceeding from such Darknesse and to whom it accreweth
392
A Review and Conclusion
401
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Acerca del autor (2009)

Thomas Hobbes was born in Malmesbury, the son of a wayward country vicar. He was educated at Magdalen Hall, Oxford, and was supported during his long life by the wealthy Cavendish family, the Earls of Devonshire. Traveling widely, he met many of the leading intellectuals of the day, including Francis Bacon, Galileo Galilei, and Rene Descartes. As a philosopher and political theorist, Hobbes established---along with, but independently of, Descartes---early modern modes of thought in reaction to the scholasticism that characterized the seventeenth century. Because of his ideas, he was constantly in dispute with scientists and theologians, and many of his works were banned. His writings on psychology raised the possibility (later realized) that psychology could become a natural science, but his theory of politics is his most enduring achievement. In brief, his theory states that the problem of establishing order in society requires a sovereign to whom people owe loyalty and who in turn has duties toward his or her subjects. His prose masterpiece Leviathan (1651) is regarded as a major contribution to the theory of the state.

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