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the people 7 which | thou hast re | deemed: || thou hast guided them | 7 in thy | strength | 7 unto thy | holy | habi | tation. ||| 7 The people shall | hear, and be a | fraid: || sorrow | 1 shall take | hold 7 on the inhabitants of Palestina. | | Then the Dukes of | Edom | 7 shall be a mazed; || 1 the | mighty | men of | Moab, || trembling | 7 shall take hold up on them: || all the in | habitants | 1 of Canaan | 1 shall | melt a | way. ||| Fear and dread | 7 shall fall up on them; || 7 by the greatness of thine | arm | they shall be as still | 7 as a stone; 7 till thy | people | pass | over, | 1 which | thou hast | purchased. ||| Thou shalt | bring them | in, | 7 and plant them | 7 in the | mountain

7 of thine inheritance, 7 in the | place, |0| Lord, 7 which | thou hast | made | 7 for | thee to dwell in ; | 7 in the | sanctuary, | O|Lord,|7 which thy hands 7 have established. ||| 1 Je | hovah | | 7 shall reign | 7 for | ever | 1 and | ever. |||

EXERCISE IV.

THE EXILE OF ERIN.

T. Campbell.

7 There came to the | beach | 7 a poor | exile of | Erin, |

7 The dew on his | thin ❘ robe | 7 was | heavy and | chill; ||

1 For his country he sighed, | 7 when at | twilight repairing,

1 To wander a lone | 7 by the wind-beaten | hill.|||

1 But the day-star | 7 at | tracted his eye's sad de | votion;

1 For it rose 7 on his own native | isle of the | ocean,

7 Where once 7 in the fervor of youth's warın

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emotion

7 He sung the bold | anthem | 7 of | Erin go | bragh. |||

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Sad is my fate! | 7 (said the heart- | broken | stranger) |

7 The wild-deer and wolf | 1 to a covert can

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flee,

1 But I have no refuge | 1 from | famine and | danger,

1 A home, and a country | 7 re main not to me. ||

Never again | 7 in the green | sunny | bowers |

1 Where my forefathers | liv'd | 7 shall I spend the sweet hours |

1 Or cover my harp | 1 with the wild woven | flowers

1 And strike to the numbers | 7 of | Erin go | bragh. || |

Erin! my country! | 7 though sad and for |

saken,

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1 In dreams 7 I re
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1 But alas! 7 in a

1 And sigh for the no more. ||

visit thy | sea-beaten | shore : | far foreign | land I a | waken, | friends | 7 that can meet me

Oh! cruel fate! | 7 wilt thou | never re | place me | 7 In a mansion of peace, | 7 where no perils can chase me? |

| Never a gain shall my | brothers em | brace me, || 7 They died to defend me, 7 or | live to de 1

plore. |||

Where is my cabin door, | fast by the wild | wood? |

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| Sisters and sire, | 7 did ye | weep for its | fall?||| Where is the mother that | looked on my | childhood?|||

1 And where is the bosom- | friend, | dearer than | all? | | |

Ah! 1 my sad soul, | long a | bandoned by | pleasure, ||

Why did it doat on a fast-fading | treasure? | | | Tears, 1 like the | rain-drops | 7 may fall without

measure,

1 But | rapture and | beauty | 7 they | cannot re | call. ||| Yet 7 all its fond | 7 recollections suppressing | wish | 7 my | lone | bosom shall | draw.

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| One | dying

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||| Erin! 7 an | Land of my Buried and motion,

exile | 1 be | queaths thee his | blessing | forefathers! || Erin go | bragh! || cold, 7 when my heart | stills her |

| Green be thy fields | sweetest | isle of the ocean | 7 And thy | harp-striking | bards | sing aloud with devotion

Erin 7 ma vournin! | Erin | go | bragh. |||

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EXERCISE V.

LUCY.--Wordsworth.

Three years 7 she | grew, | 7 in | sun and | shower,

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Then nature said, | 7a | lovelier | flower |

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1 On earth | 7 was This child I to my | I

never | sown: || self | 7 will | take; |

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| She shall be | mine, || and I will | make | 1 A | lady | 7 of my | own. |||

7 My self will to my darling || be, │

1 Both | law and | impulse: || 7 and with | me |

7 The girl 7 in | rock | 7 and | plain, |

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7 In earth and heaven, | 7 in | glade and | bower, |

7 Shall feel 7 an | over | seeing | power |

7 To kindle 7 and re | strain. |||

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She shall be sportive | 7 as the | fawn |

1 That wild with | glee | 1 a cross the | lawn | 7 Or | up the mountain || springs; ||

7 Andhers 7 shall be the breathing | balm, | 7 And | hers | 7 the silence | 7 and the | calm | 7 Of❘ mute in sensate | things. |||

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7 The floating | clouds | 7 their | state shall | lend | 1 To | her; 7 for | her | 7 the | willow | bend ; | Nor shall she fail to see, I

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Even in the motions | 7 of the storm |

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Grace | 7 that shall | mould | 7 the | maiden's | form,| 1 By silent sympathy. ||

| 7 The stars of | midnight | 7 shall be | dear | 7 To her; and she shall | lean her | ear |

7 In many a secret | place, |

7 Where | rivulets | dance their | wayward | round ; ||

1 And | beauty, || born of | murmuring | sound, | 7 Shall pass into her | face. |||

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7 And vital feelings of de | light |

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1 Shall | rear her | form | 7 to | stately | height; ||

1 Her virgin bosom | swell; ||

Such thoughts 7 to | Lucy | 7 I will | give, |

1 While she and | I│7 to | gether | live | Here 7 in this happy | dell.'|||

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Thus Nature | spake. || 1 The | work | 7 was | done. |||

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1 How soon 7 my | Lucy's
1 She died, and left to

7 This heath, 7 this | calm and
7 The memory of what has
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| 7 And never | more | will be. |||

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race | 7 was | run! ||

me |
quiet | scene; |

been, |

EXERCISE VI.

PAPER.-A CONVERSATIONAL PLEASANTRY.

Dr. Franklin.

Some wit of old, || such | wits of old there |

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were,

1 Whose hints | 7 showed | meaning, 1 whose allusions care, ||

1 By one brave | stroke | 7 to | mark all | human | kind,

Called clear | blank | paper | every | infant | mind; | |

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