Poems by the Late Rev. Edward Smedley, A. M.: With a Selection from His Correspondence and a Memoir of His Life

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Baldwin and Cradock, 1837 - 457 páginas
 

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Página 102 - Finally, we commend to thy fatherly goodness all those who are any ways afflicted, or distressed in mind, body, or estate ; that it may please thee to comfort and relieve them according to their several necessities, giving them patience under their sufferings, and a happy issue out of all their afflictions.
Página 128 - That naught his wandering eyes had seen So mild, so tranquil, so serene. And yet, with fond and eager view, I turn, and other course pursue; Catching, beyond the sea-girt strand, Dark glimmerings of a distant land, Mountains which fancy scarce can shape, , Bold rock, and far projecting cape, And earth so mingled with the sky, 'Twere hard to tell the boundary. I know not if that far-off land Be some accursed and desert strand, Where o'er the mountain's summit bleak No sounds but of the tempest speak,...
Página 129 - mid the soft and tranquil scene Of sea, and sky, and forest green, I reck not these, but inly sigh That unacquainted coast to try. Oh ! if some...
Página 443 - ... at Bath, as the other for her health. Thus you see, my good friend, we have all something to make us think less complacently of the world. Religion will do great things. It will always make the bitter waters of Marah wholesome and palatable. But we must not think it will usually turn water to wine, because it once did so.
Página 146 - Yet gather not, although its fruit be streak'd with hues of gold. The cup is dancing to thy lip, and fragrant is the wine, Yet dash the untasted goblet down, though lusciously it shine. For bitter ashes lurk...
Página 129 - Fair undistinguish'd forms of love, And round the dim horizon press Imagined shapes of happiness ; Yet, stay awhile ! thine eye has stray'd To scenes which, view'd more closely, fade ; Take what thy pow'r may now command, All onward is — the far-off land ! REASON.
Página 233 - ... impervious to the rays of the sun. This valley is interspersed with eleven lakes. The waters are completely stagnant, their hue is dark and dismal. These lakes connecting one with another, in two circles, form a double moat about the monastery. In the middle of the day the venerable abbey of La Trappe appears rising in the centre. In the morning and evening the exhalations arising from the waters are so thick, that only its dark grey towers, above the curling vapour, or the deep tone of its bell,...
Página 74 - ... the farthest remove from arrogance or vanity. The humility of a noble mind scarcely dares to approve of itself, until it has secured the approbation of others. Very different is that restless desire of distinction, that passion for theatrical display, which inflames the heart and occupies the whole attention of vain men. This, of all the passions, is the most unsocial, avarice itself not excepted.
Página 443 - Thus you see, my good friend, we have all something to make us think less complaisantly of the world. Religion will do great things. It will always make the bitter waters of Marah wholesome and palatable. But we must not think it will usually turn water into wine because it did so once. Nor is it fit that it should ; unless this were our place of rest, where we were to expect the Bridegroom.
Página 79 - ... for all. Oft was occasion given me to perceive How the calm pleasures of the pasturing Herd To happy contemplation soothed his walk ; How the poor Brute's condition, forced to run Its course of suffering in the public road, Sad contrast ! all too often smote his heart With unavailing pity. Rich in love And sweet humanity, he was, himself, To the degree that he desired, beloved.

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