Memoirs of the Life of Gilbert Wakefield, Volumen1

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Página 307 - One witness shall not rise up against a man for any iniquity, or for any sin, in any sin that he sinneth: at the mouth of two witnesses, or at the mouth of three witnesses, shall the matter be established.
Página 122 - ... the church; to whose service, by the intentions of my parents and friends, I was destined of a child, and in mine own resolutions, till coming to some maturity of years, and perceiving what tyranny had invaded the church, that he who would take orders must subscribe slave, and take an oath wilhal ; which unless he took with a conscience that would retch, he must either strait perjure, or split his faith; I thought it better to prefer a blameless silence, before the sacred office of speaking,...
Página 333 - TIRED Nature's sweet restorer, balmy Sleep ! He, like the world, his ready visit pays Where Fortune smiles ; the wretched he forsakes ; Swift on his downy pinion flies from woe, And lights on lids unsullied with a tear.
Página 346 - To them his heart, his love, his griefs were given, But all his serious thoughts had rest in Heaven. As some tall cliff, that lifts its awful form, Swells from the vale and midway leaves the storm, Though round its breast the rolling clouds are spread, Eternal sunshine settles on its head.
Página 306 - Lift the faint head, and bend the imploring eye ; Till Death, in kindness, from the tortured breast Calls the free spirit to the realms of rest. Shame to Mankind ! But shame to BRITONS most, Who all the sweets of Liberty can boast ; Yet, deaf to every human claim, deny That bliss to others, which themselves enjoy: Life's bitter draught with harsher bitter fill ; Blast every joy, and add to every ill ; The trembling limbs with galling iron bind, Nor loose the heavier bondage of the mind.
Página 144 - The number of learned persons in these celebrated seats is still considerable, and more conveniences and opportunities for study still subsist in them, than in any other place. There is at least one very powerful incentive to learning ; I mean the GENIUS of the place.
Página 122 - ... coming to some maturity of years, and perceiving what tyranny had invaded the church, that he who would take orders must subscribe slave, and take an oath withal, which, unless he took with a conscience that would retch, he must either straight perjure, or split his faith ; I thought it better to prefer a blameless silence before the sacred office of speaking, bought and begun with servitude and forswearing.
Página 309 - It is a melancholy truth, that, among the variety of actions which men are daily liable to commit, no less than a hundred and sixty have been declared, by act of parliament, to be felonies without benefit of clergy ; or, in other words, to be worthy of instant death.
Página 537 - And then the lover Sighing like furnace, with a woful ballad Made to his mistress
Página 5 - God, as he doth hang the greatest weight upon the smallest wires, " maxima e minimis suspendens," it comes therefore to pass, that such histories do rather set forth the pomp of business than the true and inward resorts thereof. But Lives, if they be well written, propounding to themselves a person to represent in whom actions both greater and smaller, public and private, have a commixture, must of necessity contain a more true, native, and lively representation.

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